Different Versions One Hears – Henry Sewell

“[Robert Heaton]Rhodes (otherwise Bob the nipper)was there.  What a different version one hears of the same story.  It had been told greatly to [John] Deans’ credit that when the first 4 ships came out Deans supplied the settlers with meat at 6d a lb, whilst Rhodes [pictured] raised the price to 8d a lb which …

St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church

On the last Sunday of October 1853, in a small carpentry shop in Cashel Street, owned by James Johnston, a small group of Scottish Presbyterian settlers gathered together.  Among them were John and Jane Deans.  Not only was this an historic day for the Anglican based Canterbury but it was a day of reflection and …

The Deans

William Deans (1817 – 1851)                               Drowned               Place of Death: Wellington Memorial at Barbadoes Street Cemetery * Christchurch’s First Justice of Peace. John Deans (1820 – 1854)                                   Died of T.B.            Place of Death: Riccarton Buried at Barbadoes Street Cemetery Jane Deans (1823 – 1911)                                   Died of old …

Thomas Hanmer (1827 – 1892)

Thomas Hanmer (1827-1892) is mostly known as the man which Hanmer Springs is named after – even though he never settled there. He was the first to survey the area in 1852. Named “Te Whakatakaka O Te O Ahi Tamatea” by the Maori, to the Europeans it was a good route to drive their cattle …

Sir George Seymour – the 3rd Ship

The Sir George Seymour was the third ship to dock at Lyttelton, arriving 24 hours (to the hour) after the Charlotte Jane dropped her anchor. She was though, the last of the four to leave England, carrying 227 souls to a new life. Before her journey to Lyttelton in 1850, she had a history as …

Henry Sewell (1807 – 1879)

Henry Sewell could do amazing things with money and numbers – which made him more than a little unpopular! Henry’s father died when he was teenager and left a £3000 debt over the family from a collapsed banking project. Maybe this was when Henry’s number skills became prominent as he tackled the debt full on. …

Douglas Graham (1818 – 1872)

The news of finding coal at Homebush had been pretty exciting for the Deans and all concerned. James McIlraith – Jane Deans’ half brother and manager of Homebush – and Julius van Haast – the founder of the Canterbury Museum – had made the discovery in the late 1870’s. Just two years later, a coal …