• The Olliviers

    It was late 1853 when the Ollivier family stepped off the ‘John Taylor’ to seize all the opportunities that were on offer in Canterbury and that they did, for generations to come. John Ollivier, the head of the family, was a publisher by trade.  After receiving the best education in France, the British born teenager …

  • GEBBIES PASS – Mary Gebbie (? – ?)

    Gebbies Valley and Pass were known during the 1830’s as ‘Maori Valley” by the Rhodes brothers of Purau as it was a busy trail that the Maori used when heading south. The Maori called it Kawa Taua. Captain Fredrick Tuckett used the trail on the 4th June 1844. He was inspecting the Peninsula and the …

  • The Goulds

    “On the east side of Market Place stood Mr. Gould’s General Store with a great barrier in the middle of the floor filled with fascinating coils of rope-like tobacco – fascinating because we thought it was good to having (having I suppose watched sailors and Maoris chewing lumps) till an experimentalising younger brother nearly put …

  • The Cholmondeley Family

    Among the other immigrants aboard the ‘Charlotte Jane’ were cousins, Thomas and Charles Cholmondeley. Unlike many of the other settlers on board, these cousins had no obvious reason to seek out a chance for a better life. They came from a very rich noble family…maybe this was the reason the pair broke away – that …

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